The Kemper County Historical Association held its annual Heritage Day Saturday at Museum in downtown DeKalb. Among the members who attended pictured are, from left, Dorothy Bradford, Larry Gibson, Grace Gibson, Mary Jane Nelson, Bobbie May, J.L. White, Barbara Brown, Margaret Womble, Cheryl Sparkman, Frances Brown, Kate Wilson and Bonnie Thomas.
The Kemper County Historical Association held its annual Heritage Day Saturday at Museum in downtown DeKalb. Among the members who attended pictured are, from left, Dorothy Bradford, Larry Gibson, Grace Gibson, Mary Jane Nelson, Bobbie May, J.L. White, Barbara Brown, Margaret Womble, Cheryl Sparkman, Frances Brown, Kate Wilson and Bonnie Thomas.
By Steve Swogetinsky

Kemper Messenger



The Kemper County Historical Society had a good crowd Saturday as it held its annual Heritage Day at the museum in the old Stennis warehouse in downtown DeKalb.

Organizers describe the day as a “homecoming” of sorts with people coming from all over coming to visit and celebrate history.

The society sold pulled pork sandwiches which is its only fund-raiser for its different project. The group has been busy in the year since the last Heritage Day a year ago. They have dedicated historical markers at Electric Mills and in front of the County Courthouse in DeKalb that honored Rueben Kemper, the name sake for the county.

Members also put up a unique sawblade sign for the museum which has an old sawblade in reflection of the county’s historical ties in the lumber business.

“We are a close knit group of people interested in preserving history,” said Cheryl Sparkman. “We have had so many projects that have come into being.  The sawblade sign outside and the touch-up work in the museum were some of our most recent projects. We have several ideas for historical markers. We will have to decide what is next.”



The museum holds many artifacts from Kemper County’s history. There are old photos, newspaper clippings and books.There are tools that were once used every day and now have been forgotten.

“It’s one thing to see something on a computer screen,” Sparkman said. “But when you see it in person and get to hold something in your hands, you get a better understanding.

“We welcome the school children and the college students to come and tour the museum. There is so much to see. Students do research papers all the time, and this is something they can use.”